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What’s it called when a movie “translates” from the “character” spoken language to the language of audience?

By admin - Sun Aug 19, 2:56 pm

Question by : What’s it called when a movie “translates” from the “character” spoken language to the language of audience?
There’s a special word for this, I’m pretty sure.

It’s not “anachronism” or “translation”.

Examples of this would be:

In the film “Gladiator” with Russell Crowe, the film is in English, but in actuality, the characters are “speaking” classical Latin. The characters don’t actually know or speak English.

In the “Star Wars” universe, people speak Basic (which presumably, in “actuality”, sounds nothing like English) but when we watch the films they are speaking in English. The characters themselves don’t actually know or speak English, however, they are actually speaking “Basic”.

In an episode of the television series “LOST”, in an episode which focused on the backstory of Jacob, the episode starts out with them speaking Latin (iirc), but then quickly switches to English for the audiences’ benefit. The characters don’t actually know or speak English (at that point).

In the video game “Eternal Darkness: Sanity’s Requiem”, a scene starts off with people speaking Latin, but then quickly switches to English so that the audience can understand. The characters don’t actually know or speak English (at that point), they are still speaking Latin, we only hear it as English.

Basically, it’s when the characters themselves are speaking a certain language, but we the audience “hear” that language in our language. There’s a distinction between the language the characters (not the actors) are speaking and the language the audience “hears” them speaking.

Best answer:

Answer by Dances With Mops 2 – Mop Bucket Boogaloo
Dubbing.

What do you think? Answer below!

2 Comments

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  1. 0

    Ignore the other comment, dubbing is when an English voice is placed over the person who is actually speaking French, for example, but we can tell they’re not talking ‘cos the words don’t match the lip synchronisation.
    For your question though, it’s just for the benefit of the audience most of the time. The actors would have to learn Latin, like in Rome where they speak British, which would mean the film would have to be subtitled. Studios have the right choice, as hiring language coaches would be expensive for 100 odd speaking roles for the LOTR trilogy! It is quite weird and annoying at times, like when Nazis talk to each other in war films, they speak English when they’re all German! It’s best to forget about it.

  2. 0

    I get what you mean. It’s definitely not translation (but translation is the closest term), it can’t be transliteration either.

    My safest bet would have to be an “Interpretation”.

    It’s like currency, everyone’s got it. But they all refer to it differently (only difference is the value).

    Could be Conversion, Reformation/Reconstruction/Remodelled, Transfigured?

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